Setting up a business in Brazil

 The ultimate guide – Part II

Is it complicated? Can I have an idea of the different steps?

Brazil has a high level of bureaucracy. We will explain bellow the step by step timeline to the creation of two companies in Brazil. These case studies are based on real companies that set up operations in Brazil.

 

Case Study 1 – Joint Venture

Multi-function business

  • Sell UK-created SaaS to Brazilian companies
  • Provide customer support to existing and growing customer base across Latin America

Why a JV?

  • Customer pressure forcing urgent establishment
  • Had to have branding and country presence
  • Only justified 3 staff initially
  • UK owner could only dedicate minimum resources due to other commitments

 

Case Study 1:

  • UK business determined Sao Paulo as an ideal base                                        [Day 1]
  • 15 possible partners found through remote library research                         [Day 15]
  • Prospectus sent and telephone call with CEO of each of 15                            [Day 18]
  • 3 were not interested, reducing list to 12                                                            [Day 30]
  • 6 of those eliminated by local representative visit                                            [Day 40]
  • Shortlist of 6 – half day visit by UK team (with local support) to each        [Days 55-57]
    • 4 in Sao Paulo metro area
    • 1 in Campinas
    • 1 in Sorocaba
  • First choice – one in Sao Paulo                                                                              [Day 60]
    • Fell through on business negotiation on terms within 3 days

Second choice (in Sorocaba) selected                                                                              [Day 63]

 

Remaining steps:

  • Legal agreements reviewed and refined by both parties                                   [Day 75]
  • Employee hiring process started                                                                             [Day 76]
  • UK Power of Attorney signed and sent for legalisation                                      [Day 76]
  • Company registered as 50/50 JV – Contrato Social signed                              [Day 85]
  • Candidates interviewed, and 3 selected                                                                 [Days 86-87]
  • 3 employees start work and training                                                                       [Day 90]
  • All other necessary business setup arrangements in place                                 [Day 95]

Official launch of Brazil company and announcement to world                                  [Day 100]

 

Case Study 2: Wholly-Owned

Provide communications and hospitality support to broadcasters and sponsors of major events – initially World Cup 2014 then Olympics 2016

  • Branded local presence essential for contracts with certain Brazilian suppliers and partners
  • Paramount need for total control over product quality
  • Urgency dictated by event timings

 

In case study 2:

  • Business requirements and deadlines dictated                                                                    [Day 1]
  • Decision made to pursue Turnkey Solution                                                                          [Day 2]
  • Detailed proposal and company definition drafted                                                            [Day 12]
  • Proposal and Definitions refined and agreed with UK management                             [Day 20]
  • UK contract for ownership handover signed                                                                       [Day 20]
  • Hiring process for Manager and Sales person commenced                                              [Day 21]
  • Contrato Social signed and legalised, interim Administrator appointed                       [Day 30]
  • Serviced offices contracted, initial staff interviewed and hired                                        [Day 44]
  • Banking, Accountants, Lawyers appointed                                                                           [Day 50]
  • Business launched and trading                                                                                                [Day 60]
  • UK Power of Attorney signed and sent for legalisation                                                      [Day 61]
  • Revised Contrato Social signed and legalised                                                                       [Day 70]

Company now fully owned by original UK parent                                                                          [Day 70]

 

Nice… Can I do the same for my company?

Contact us for a free consultation on: +44 (0)20 7278 9210.

 

by Oliver Dowson, CEO – ICC – International Corporate Creations

These case studies were presented at the UKTI Exporting is Great – Opportunities in Latin America Roadshow

Setting up a business in Brazil

 The ultimate guide – Part I

Why would I set up a business operation in Brazil?

There are many advantages to having your own company compared to relying on distributors and agents:

  • Local Branding and Identity
  • Control
  • Confidence that business and legal objectives are met
  • Add local content to unfinished products (or manage OEMs)
  • Ability to develop insourcing capabilities to support other operations
  • Act as a regional base to take advantage of MERCOSUR

 

Sounds good, I am convinced? But, what type of the company?

There are several legal types of companies, but on this article we are only considering:

  • Joint Venture
    • Local partner brings management skills for HR, legal and financial matters, and possibly premises or other things
    • You bring brand name, product/service, know-how
  • Wholly-Owned

 

Brazil a quite big. Where should I set up in Brazil?

Location is important!

  • Different state regulations and taxes
  • Physical distribution – infrastructure varies, and distances can be huge
  • Education, skills and experience of potential employees
  • Communications infrastructure
  • Access from the UK

 

(please read more on the “Part II” entrance for this topic.)

 

by Oliver Dowson, CEO – ICC – International Corporate Creations

These case studies were presented at the UKTI Exporting is Great – Opportunities in Latin America Roadshow

It’s business as normal in Brazil

… and a good time to grasp opportunities

Reading the press and watching TV news covering the current impeachment process of Dilma Roussef, you might think that Brazil is descending into chaos.  But for Brazilian companies, and for 99% of the population, it’s very much business as usual.   And for international companies, now is a great time to grasp the nettle and exploit this market.

I’ve just returned from meetings with several recent start-ups in Brazil, and can vouch for the continuing high level of enthusiastic confidence that they will achieve great economic success.   Nobody is fazed by the political situation – almost everyone in business is looking forward to Dilma going, even if so many other untrustworthy politicians will remain in office, as it’s a first and big step towards improving the country.

It’s true that the economy has nose-dived in the last year, but this is more down to the depressed mining sector, that has become increasingly reliant on the Chinese market, which has largely dried up.   The spark that came with the discovery of huge oil reserves under the sea off Rio has dampened more because of the fall in oil prices than the “car wash” corruption scandal at Petrobras.

Unfortunately, the corruption scandals have further discouraged foreign direct investment and business expansion in Brazil.  The reality is that corruption is largely off the map for most businesses.  I’ve set up, managed and grown several companies there since 2006, and have never in that time even seen suggestions of bribery or false accounting. That’s not to say it doesn’t exist – when it comes to government or very large corporate contracts, clearly it does.   I can see how some Brazilian accounting practices, such as allowing small businesses to work on “Lucro Presumido” (presumed profit) could support it.  However, I believe that international businesses starting up in Brazil can be confident that they won’t get involved in any way.

Confidence in Brazil has picked up a great deal in the last few months, as evidenced by the improvement both in the exchange rate and the stock exchange (see charts).  The exchange rate is still around half that of 3 years ago, and looks to have stabilised.

Whilst this – in addition to tariff barriers – can make the Brazilian market unattractive for most exporters, it’s very good value now for setting up in-country operations such as Shared Service Centres, in/out-sourcing, and local manufacturing for the MERCOSUR countries.

The overwhelmingly young workforce is increasingly well-educated, and it’s easy to hire professionals in most sectors who have very good English.  In my experience, productivity levels can be impressive.   There are some interesting barriers to overcome.   Brazilian employment laws are archaic and byzantine, all staff are “unionised” (but not in the sense understood in other countries), annual salary increases are mandated, the paperwork can be formidable.  However, all these can be addressed in a straightforward way, with some professional help, and the advantages of having 3 or 4 professionals for the price of one definitely outweigh the disadvantages.

It’s also one of the most pleasant countries to live, work and do business.   If the weather alone doesn’t lift one’s spirits, the enthusiasm and “can do” attitude of the Brazilian people will.

 

Brazil Stock Exchange Index

Brazil Stock Exchange Index

 

Brazilian Real Exchange Rate

Brazil Exchange Rate

 

 

by Oliver Dowson, CEO, ICC – International Corporate Creations

(Graphic Brazil Stock Exchange Index – courtesy Google)
(Graphic Real Exchange Rate – courtesy Yahoo)